Proctosedyl

Proctosedyl

Proctosedyl is a combination of three ingredients: cinchocaine, hydrocortisone and framycetin that work together to treat haemorrhoids and rectal lesions.   The active ingredient in Protesedyl is cinchocaine which is a local anaesthetic. More information

A doctor will review your order and write you a prescription, if appropriate. This prescription is then forwarded to a pharmacy. The pharmacy will have your medicine delivered to you within one to three working days. Read more about this process here.

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Proctosedyl is the brand name for a treatment for the pain and discomfort of haemorrhoids (piles) that many people experience. This product comes in the form of an ointment or suppositories that treats the symptoms of this uncomfortable condition in the privacy of your own home. Proctosedyl must be prescribed by a doctor and is not usually used for more than 7 days. 

What is Proctosedyl? 

Proctosedyl is a combination of three ingredients: cinchocaine, hydrocortisone and framycetin that work together to treat haemorrhoids and rectal lesions.  

The active ingredient in Protesedyl is cinchocaine which is a local anaesthetic. A local anaesthetic numbs an area of the body to treat pain. It works by preventing the nerves in the area where it is applied sending signals to your brain and causing you pain. Local anaesthetics work rapidly which is why Proctosedyl can help the discomfort of haemorrhoids. 

Hydrocortisone is used to treat various skin conditions and reduce redness, swelling and itching. This medication belongs to a group called corticosteroid drugs that suppress inflammation and your immune system. 

Framycetin is an antibiotic that is used to treat and prevent bacterial infections.  

Protosedyl comes in the form of a topical ointment or suppositories that is applied to the rectum (back passage) and can give fast relief to the irritation and pain haemorrhoids cause. A suppository is a way of slowly releasing medicine into the body. It is usually in the form of a small oval-shaped object that is inserted into the rectum. The body then absorbs the medicine.  

Haemorrhoids (also referred to as piles) are swollen blood vessels caused by pressure on the rectal or anal area. They are lumps that protrude around the rectum area and can itch and be painful if left untreated. They can be more uncomfortable and noticeable when passing large stools or sitting on a hard surface. They can occur internally or externally and are very common. Proctosedyl ointment is used to treat haemorrhoids that occur externally and Proctosedyl suppositories are used for those that occur internally. Haemorrhoids can be caused by straining when going to the toilet (passing stools), constipation, a poor diet that doesn´t contain enough fibre (fruit, vegetables, salad and bran products) pregnancy, (check with your doctor before using this medication if you are pregnant or breastfeeding) childbirth and old age. This condition can also occur in people who are overweight or who regularly suffer from constipation. 

Many people are embarrassed about having haemorrhoids, however, this is not usually a serious condition and mild forms can be easily treated. You should not avoid talking to your doctor as they will be used to treating this kind of condition. More serious cases of haemorrhoids may require hospital treatment if using an ointment or suppository is not effective. You should talk to your doctor if you have haemorrhoids and they do not go away after treatment with an ointment or suppository. 

When is Proctosedyl used? 

Proctosedyl is commonly used to treat haemorrhoids. It can reduce the swelling, pain and inflammation that haemorrhoids cause in the anal and rectum area. It also helps the haemorrhoids to heal faster. This medication can also be used to treat rectal lesions and other rectal pain and discomfort, such as that which may occur after rectal surgery. It can provide immediate relief if you are suffering from the discomfort of haemorrhoids as it is applied directly onto the source of the pain, swelling or itching. 

How do you use Proctosedyl? 

Ointment – first the hands and anal area should be washed and gently dried by patting with a clean towel. Then a small quantity is applied to the rectum area with the fingertip after each bowel movement and in the morning and evening.  

Sometimes the ointment may need to be inserted inside the rectum using the applicator provided (on the advice of a doctor). This is done by affixing the applicator to the tube of ointment, inserting the applicator into the rectum and gently squeezing the tube to insert the ointment whilst withdrawing it at the same time. The applicator and hands should be washed with warm soapy water after every application. 

Suppositories - first the hands and anal area should be washed and gently dried by patting with a clean towel. Then one suppository is inserted into the rectum area after each bowel movement and in the morning and evening. The hands should be washed after every application. Once the suppository has been inserted you should lie or sit still for approximately 15 minutes to allow time for it to dissolve and start to work. 

The Proctosedyl ointment can be stored at room temperature and the Proctosedyl suppositories should be stored in a refrigerator.  

Do not touch your face or other parts of your body if you have Proctosedyl on your fingers as this could cause irritation to the skin. The ointment is a yellow/white colour and quite greasy and it may stain underwear or clothing so take care when using it. Proctosedyl should not be used for more than 7 days unless you are advised to use it for longer by a doctor. It is a short-term treatment. If your doctor suggests you use this medication for more than 7 days they may suggest that you reduce the number of daily applications. This is not a long-term medication and you should only use it as prescribed by your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication after 7 days then take it again a while later without speaking to your doctor. If you mistakenly use Proctosedyl for longer than 7 days you should inform your doctor as soon as possible. 

The prolonged use of Proctosedyl suppositories can cause a condition known as adrenal suppression, which is a secondary form of adrenal insufficiency.  When this happens your adrenal glands do not make enough of the hormones the body needs to perform its basic functions such as controlling blood pressure, controlling how your immune systems reacts to viruses and releasing sugar into your blood to give you energy. 

Symptoms of problems with your adrenal glands can be an upset stomach, being sick, dizziness, fainting, feeling tired, loss of appetite, weak muscles and weight loss. 

What dosages are there? 

The most common dose of Proctosedyl for adults is: 

  • Ointment: a thin layer applied to the rectum area morning and night and after each bowel movement 
  • Suppositories: one suppository is inserted into the rectum morning and night and after each bowel movement 

Your doctor will prescribe the exact dosage that is right for you depending on your individual circumstances. Do not take more of this medication than the doctor prescribes. 

Proctosedyl is not suitable for children. 

You should never take Proctosedyl orally. 

What are the side effects of Proctosedyl? 

As with all medicines, Proctosedyl can sometimes have side effects, but these will not occur for everyone and are unusual when using this product. The most common side effects that may occur are: 

  • A skin rash 
  • A burning sensation 
  • Irritation due to sensitivity to cinchocaine, hydrocortisone, framycetin or any of the other ingredients (see package leaflet for a list of these ingredients)  

You should inform your doctor if the skin in the anal area appears to be redder and more inflamed after using Proctosedyl as this could be the sign of an infection. 

When shouldn’t you use Proctosedyl? 

Do not use Proctosedyl if you: 

  • Are allergic to any of the ingredients listed on the package leaflet 
  • Have thin skin that damages easily 
  • Have an untreated fungal (such as thrush), bacterial or parasitic infection (for example worms) 
  • Have a viral infection  
  • Have an infection that is related to the anus or surrounding area, such as a sexually transmitted infection (Proctosedyl can make it worse) 
  • Have tuberculosis (TB) 

Proctosedyl can sometimes cover up the signs of infection. You should tell your doctor if there is any blood when you pass stools. 

It is not advisable to use Proctosedyl if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. This is because corticosteriods can be absorbed by the body and harm a developing baby. Only take this medication when pregnant on the advice of your doctor. If you are breastfeeding your should talk to your doctor before taking Proctosedyl. 

This medication should not be used by children. 

There is a possibility that this medicine may affect the rubber in condoms so it is not advisable to use a condom if you are using Proctosedyl as the two may easily come into contact. 

Does Proctosedyl interact with other medication? 

Proctosedyl may have an effect on the way some other medication works. Therefore it is essential to tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking any medicines, including herbal medicines. Proctosedyl does not interact with alcohol or particular foods and does not affect your ability to drive safely or operate machinery. 

Where can you buy Proctosedyl? 

You can only get Proctosedyl from a pharmacy if you have a prescription from a doctor. 

Can I get Proctosedyl without a prescription? 

No, you must have a prescription from a doctor to get Proctosedyl. 

Sources 

PACKAGE LEAFLET: INFORMATION FOR THE USER. Proctosedyl Ointment.  Cinchocaine hydrochloride 0.5%w/w Hydrocortisone 0.5%w/w. October, 2012. Retrieved 30 August, 2019 from https://s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/docomimg2.s3.amazonaws.com/leaflets/en/patient_information_leaflet-2588-proctosedyl-zalf-uk.pdf-1510756508.pdf 

PACKAGE LEAFLET: INFORMATION FOR THE USER. Proctosedyl Suppositories.  Cinchocaine hydrochloride 5mg Hydrocortisone 5mg. October, 2012. Retrieved 30 August, 2019 from https://s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/docomimg2.s3.amazonaws.com/leaflets/en/patient_information_leaflet-2589-proctosedyl-zetpillen-uk.pdf-1510756508.pdf 

Proctosedyl ointment/suppositories (cinchocaine, hydrocortisone). June 20, 2012. Retrieved 30 August, 2019 from https://www.netdoctor.co.uk/medicines/digestion/a7401/proctosedyl-ointment-suppositories-cinchocaine-hydrocortisone/ 

Hydrocortisone for piles and itchy bottom. September 19, 2017. Retrieved 30 August, 2019 from https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/hydrocortisone-for-piles-and-itchy-bottom/